Around the World in Four and a Half Years

sketchtravel

In addition to the Ezra Jack Keats exhibit (see previous post), the Cartoon Art Museum was my second destination in San Francisco. I had no idea that the Sketch Travel Project would be on display and was in for a delightful surprise. I love to view other people’s sketchbooks because they allow me to see the thoughts and processes of their ideas. But this blew my mind as far as sketchbooks go. The Sketch Travel project began in 2006; it was a collaboration between seventy-one artists from twelve countries. The sketchbook was passed from person to person until 2011 when it was completed and auctioned off to raise money for Room to Read, an international non-profit organization.

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What blew my mind most of all was that Hayao Miyazaki was one of the artists involved. Some of the other incredibly talented artists are:

Yuko Shimizu

Yuko Shimizu

Luis Grane

Luis Grane

Bob McKenzie

Bob McKenzie

Taiyo Matsumoto

Taiyo Matsumoto

Quentin Blake

Quentin Blake

Greg Couch

Greg Couch

Leuyen Pham

Leuyen Pham

I wish I would post all seventy-one pieces on my blog for you to see. By the way, the sketchbook has been reprinted and is available on Amazon.com for purchase. All in all, visiting the two galleries was a breath of much-needed inspiration.

Food for the Artist’s Soul

snowy day

The holiday season has kept me in a whirlwind but I did manage to take the day off last Tuesday to visit two galleries in San Francisco. The first one was the Contemporary Jewish Museum showcasing Ezra Jack Keats’ artwork.

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His books extend back to my childhood when Peter’s Chair and Whistle for Willie was my introduction to an African-American boy named Peter.

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Keats is a pioneer in the children’s book arena in which Snowy Day was the very first children’s book portraying an African-American boy as a protagonist in color; it was even published at the height of the Civil Rights Movement, which was a miracle. Keats’ art resonates within his soul as he was a poor Jewish kid who grew up in east Brooklyn, the poorest part of the neighborhood. He sees beauty even in the dilapidated tenement buildings and streets with overflowing garbage cans. Most of all, he breaks the mode for future stories for children where their skin color is validated and not stereotyped.

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On viewing Keats’ artwork in person, I was struck by how simple they are but their simplicity speaks in a way that moves my heart. Ezra Jack Keats has become one of my heroes in illustration.